Carolina Reaper Pepper Lands Man in Hospital with 'Thunderclap Headaches'


A man ate a Carolina Reaper for a contest and the arteries in his brain constricted

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A Carolina Reaper pepper landed a man in a hospital and in a medical journal.

A brave man with a taste for adventure and spicy food got more than he bargained for and wound up as a case study in a medical journal after he ate a whole Carolina Reaper pepper and started suffering extreme headaches that landed him in the hospital.

The Carolina Reaper is one of the world’s spiciest peppers. The Carolina Reaper’s title has been challenged since then by the Dragon’s Breath pepper, which was challenged in turn by a pepper called Pepper X in September 2017. The Carolina Reaper is still very, very spicy, though, and a 34-year-old man likely regretted consuming one in a chile-eating contest after it left him with excruciating headaches so bad he needed to be hospitalized.

According to Fox News, the man only ate one Carolina Reaper, but he started dry-heaving and experiencing severe head and neck pain immediately after the contest. The headaches got so bad that he went to the emergency room. A brain scan later showed that several arteries in his brain had constricted.

The man was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction system, or RCVS, which is a temporary condition accompanied by a sudden severe pain called a “thunderclap headache.”

RCVS had never been associated with pepper-eating before, but capsaicin, the active ingredient in hot chiles, can affect blood vessels.

“Given the development of symptoms immediately after exposure to a known vasoactive substance, it is plausible that our patient had RCVS secondary to the ‘Carolina Reaper,’” Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran of the Bassett Medical Center wrote in the British Medical Journal.

The patient recovered, and a scan taken five weeks later showed his cerebral arteries had returned to their normal size. Still, for a while he’ll probably think twice before sitting down to try any of these dishes on the list of the world’s spiciest foods.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to Hospital with Brain Effects Similar to Amphetamines

S ome like it hot. And I'm not talking about the Marilyn Monroe movie with the famous dress scene. Many people love the taste of hot peppers (do you remember when all those people tried the Devil's lollipop?). It all seems fun and hot until someone ends up in the hospital.

Meet patient A (who's name was not published) a 34-year-old man who found himself at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. after experiencing a thunderclap headache. After eating a whole Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world in a hot-pepper competition, the patient immediately started to dry heave. This wasn't concerning because dry heaving is a normal from eating hot peppers.

What was disconcerting were the massive, felt-like-you-were run-over-by-a-truck headaches that came on over the next few days.

When he arrived at the hospital scans of his head and neck indicated a constriction in some arteries that could cause intense headaches. Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the authors of the BMJ Case Report suggests "that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin."

Capsaicin, the chemical responsible for making peppers spicy, is known for constricting blood vessels. The chemical is even used in some topical medications to relief pains in muscles due to arthritis. Capsaicin is one of the main ingredients in personal safety pepper sprays.

After studying the scans, the patient was diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome which was brought on by a capsaicin sensitivity. This syndrome is usually associated with drugs like cocaine and amphetamines and some cases can become life threatening.

"This is the first time that pepper has been related to RCVS," Gunasekaran said. "Capsaicin, the key ingredient in the pepper, is a vasoactive substance, so it could potentially narrow the blood vessels to the most important organs like the heart and brain."

Thankfully the patient fully recovered and was released from the hospital.


Watch the video: CAROLINA REAPER PEPPER LANDS MAN IN HOSPITAL WITH THUNDERCLAP HEADACHES


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